Here are some helpful terms to know:

Claim - A request for payment that you or your health care provider submits to your health insurer when you get items or services you think are covered.

Cobra - A federal law that may allow you to temporarily keep health coverage after your employment ends, you lose coverage as a dependent of the covered employee, or another qualifying event. If you elect COBRA (Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act) coverage, you pay 100% of the premiums, including the share the employer used to pay, plus a small administrative fee.

Coinsurance
- The percentage of costs of a covered health care service you pay (20%, for example) after you've paid your deductible.

Copayment - A fixed amount ($20, for example) you pay for a covered health care service after you've paid your deductible

Deductible - The amount you pay for covered health care services before your insurance plan starts to pay. With a $2,000 deductible, for example, you pay the first $2,000 of covered services yourself.

Dependent - A child or other individual for whom a parent, relative, or other person may claim a personal exemption tax deduction. Under the Affordable Care Act, individuals may be able to claim a premium tax credit to help cover the cost of coverage for themselves and their dependents.

EPO (Exclusive Provider Organization) - A managed care plan where services are covered only if you go to doctors, specialists, or hospitals in the plan’s network (except in an emergency).

HMO (Health Maintenance Organization) - A type of health insurance plan that usually limits coverage to care from doctors who work for or contract with the HMO. It generally won't cover out-of-network care except in an emergency. An HMO may require you to live or work in its service area to be eligible for coverage. HMOs often provide integrated care and focus on prevention and wellness.

HSA (Health Savings Account) - A type of savings account that lets you set aside money on a pre-tax basis to pay for qualified medical expenses. By using untaxed dollars in a Health Savings Account (HSA) to pay for deductibles, copayments, coinsurance, and some other expenses, you can lower your overall health care costs. *An HSA can be used only if you have a High Deductible Health Plan (HDHP)*

In-Network Coinsurance - The percent (for example, 20%) you pay of the allowed amount for covered health care services to providers who contract with your health insurance or plan. In-network coinsurance usually costs you less than out-of-network coinsurance.

Network - The facilities, providers and suppliers your health insurer or plan has contracted with to provide health care services.

Out-of-Network Coinsurance - The percentage (for example, 40%) you pay of the allowed amount for covered health care services to providers who don't contract with your health insurance or plan. Out-of-network coinsurance usually costs you more than in-network coinsurance.

Out-of-Pocket Maximum/Limit - The most you have to pay for covered services in a plan year. After you spend this amount on deductibles, copayments, and coinsurance, your health plan pays 100% of the costs of covered benefits. The out-of-pocket limit doesn't include your monthly premiums. It also doesn't include anything you spend for services your plan doesn't cover.

Open Enrollment Period - The yearly period when people can enroll in a health insurance plan. You may still be able to enroll in a health insurance plan outside of open enrollment if you qualify for a Special Enrollment Period.

You’re eligible if you have certain life events, like getting married, having a baby, or losing other health coverage.

  • Job-based plans may have different Open Enrollment Periods. Check with your employer.
  • You can apply and enroll in Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) any time of year

PPO (Preferred Provider Organization) - A type of health plan that contracts with medical providers, such as hospitals and doctors, to create a network of participating providers. You pay less if you use providers that belong to the plan’s network. You can use doctors, hospitals, and providers outside of the network for an additional cost.

Premium
- The amount you pay for your health insurance every month. In addition to your premium, you usually have to pay other costs for your health care, including a deductible, copayments, and coinsurance. 

Summary of Benefits & Coverage (SBC) - An easy-to-read summary that lets you make apples-to-apples comparisons of costs and coverage between health plans. You can compare options based on price, benefits, and other features that may be important to you. You'll get the "Summary of Benefits and Coverage" (SBC) when you shop for coverage on your own or through your job, renew or change coverage, or request an SBC from the health insurance company.

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